2022 Photos

2022 RR Malverns All Saints Church to Chase End Hill

Malvern Hills. All Saints Church to Chase End Hill and Bromsberrow Place. Saturday 21st May 2022. A delightful ramble with a great mix of ancient lanes, woodland and open views across Worcestershire, Gloucestershire and Herefordshire. Chase End Hill is the most southerly of the Malvern Hills. The area is much more peaceful than the northern hills. Soon after leaving All Saints Church we followed The Dingle, an ancient sunken lane which was rather rutted at the start. Emerging at North Lodge, a thatched cottage, we entered the Bromsberrow Estate and followed the old road leading to Bromsberrow Place. After crossing an open field, we followed the path through a canopy of deciduous trees and rhododendron bushes which were in flower. Soon we were climbing to the summit of Chase End Hill where we were delighted that the earlier mist had cleared giving views across to Bredon hill, May Hill, Eastnor Castle and, nestling in the valley below us, the hamlet of White Leaved Oak where the three counties of Worcestershire, Gloucestershire and Herefordshire meet. After descending the hill and breaking for lunch, we re-entered the parkland of Bromsberrow Place, home to a herd of the ancient and rare White Park cattle. The estate is owned by Gilbert Greenall CBE DL. He is a senior adviser to both the UK government and United Nations on humanitarian emergencies and the welfare of civilians during and after conflict. Greenall was born the second son of the 3rd Baron Daresbury. His elder brother is Peter Greenall, 4th Baron Daresbury. He has kindly given us permission to go anywhere on his estate. John Cuthbertson

2022 Along the Tyne

Along the Tyne – Friday 13th May. There is an excellent car park at Prudhoe; plenty of room, toilets, café and free! Once a coal mining town, Prudhoe was also home to an ICI plant manufacturing fertiliser. The spoil heap from this is chalk now turfed over and called the Spetchells. This steep-sided hill formed one side of our view with the river on the other for the first mile. Then came Hagg Bank Bridge and the start of the old railway bed that runs as a shared-use path all the way to Newburn via Wylam. Just after Wylam is George Stevenson’s birthplace, a small cottage where his family would all have lived in one room. Looked after by the National Trust it was still closed as a precaution against spreading COVID. Opposite the cottage is a gate through the hedge giving access to a picnic area by the Tyne. This made a lovely lunch stop before we returned the same way. John Cuthbertson

2022 Souter Lighthouse & the Leas

Souter Lighthouse and the Leas – Thursday 11th May. Built in 1871, Souter Lighthouse was the first in the world to be designed to use alternating current and was amongst the most powerful in the world. It sits on Lizard Point but was named after Souter Point, a mile to the south, to avoid confusion with the Lizard lighthouse in Cornwall. Our ramble took us first to the south to Potters Cove then north along the Leas. This was once an area of farmland which was bought by the local miners for their recreation field. The coast of Magnesian limestone cliffs is peppered with rock stacks giving plenty of nesting sites for sea birds and great views for us. Half way along we made use of the public toilets next to Marsden Rock. This once had a staircase allowing locals and tourists to climb to the summit. Although this has gone, the Grotto and Restaurant are still open at the foot of the cliff and can be accessed by a lift or steps. Our turning point at Trow Point still holds a WW2 gun. Returning across the Leas, we finished our ramble with cream teas at the National Trust café.

2022 Craster

Craster – Tuesday 10th May. A small fishing village, Craster is famous for its smoked kippers – delicious if you can cope with the bones. The area contains outcrops of the Whinsill, a tabular layer of the igneous rock dolerite. One outcrop is now the Craster car park. The hard, angular, rock was crushed to make road chippings and was exported from the harbour. Our route took us across a flat area with the sea to the right and the low hills of the Heughs to the left. All the time our eyes were drawn to the dramatic ruins of Dunstanburgh Castle. Built when relations between King Edward II and his powerful baron, Earl Thomas of Lancaster, had become openly hostile, Lancaster began the fortress in 1313. The earl failed to reach Dunstanburgh when his rebellion was defeated, and was executed in 1322. The castle had been served by a harbour to the south side. This is still a marshy area today which caused us to climb the rocky and steep path up to the castle before descending a grassy slope. A narrow, bumpy, path took us around to the north side of the castle for our coffee stop. Sand dunes start here. These are used by the Dunstanburgh Golf Club so we made our way on the England Coast Path to the club house for lunch. Our return route took us on the other side of the Heughs which were brightly covered in flowering gorse. Finally, we climbed up and over the Heughs at Big Shaid pass giving us a grandstand view across the sea and to the castle in the north and Craster just to the south. John Cuthbertson

2022 Druridge Bay

Druridge Day – Monday 9th May. From Cresswell in the south to Amble in the north, the whole of the coast just inland of Druridge Bay was once a series of opencast coal mines. These have been replaced by a series of pools managed to attract and sustain a wide variety of birds, mammals and insects. Most of the area is managed by the local Wildlife Trust. From the Trust we had the pleasure of being joined by Lee who provided a wealth of information about the way the area has been transformed and is being managed. He was very quick to spot and point out a number of birds to us. One pool, Ladyburn Lake, is owned by Northumberland CC and is run as a Country Park. We watched in awe as people donned thin wetsuits and proceeded to swim around the lake, escorted by a stand-up paddle boarder. At the end of the lake is a ford which provided great entertainment for those who like making a splash! John Cuthbertson

2022 Nisbet

Nisbett – Friday 29th April Lovely blue skies greeted us as we set off for our ramble today in the large designed landscaped park and gardens of Monteviot. We rambled today through the woodlands, gardens and along the banks of the river Teviot to Nisbet. Our coffee stop was overlooking the river where we spotted 2 large herons who posed for photos for us. Onward we then began to climb the steep hills up to our lunch break at the Waterloo Monument passing cattle a sheep on the way. Just before reaching the top of the hill, we needed to change the towing tramper as it had begun to overheat. Once at the top the hill the 360 views of the surrounding hills were fantastic, and we spent a leisurely hour there in the glorious sunshine before descending back through the woods to the road. We returned to the visitor centre and stopped for teas and beautiful ice creams at the café. A fantastic end to our week in the Scottish Borders for which we thank James and Anne for all the hard work in organising the rambles for us under extremely difficult circumstances. Judy, Bernard and James

2022 Bowhill

Bowhill – Thursday 28th April We started on a cold frosty morning with bright blue skies. Our group of scooters and walkers met at the main car park and set off along the Duchess Drive, so called as one of the duchess’s drove in her carriage along this route which climbs steadily for some considerable distance through the trees. We had our coffee break at a stone settee where the trees opened, and the views improved. The higher, we went the better the views became looking towards the Cheviots and the Eildon Hills. We stopped for lunch at the only bench at the top with fantastic views overlooking the hills around us which we were unable to see the last time we visited in 2019 because of the rain and mist. Unfortunately, were unable to set up the toilet tent there, so after we had eaten Bernard and I went ahead to set up the toilet tent a little further on to the relief of many. After a short stop we continued downhill now looking across the fields and then into the pine forest where we could see the damage which the storms had caused there a few weeks ago. We continued towards Newark Tower (a Peel tower). This was a look out for the clans and is steeped in history. On either side of this road there were horses, sheep and lambs in the fields before we returned to the grounds of Bowhill passing the Rhododendrons coming out in their many colours and back to the car park. Judy, Bernard and James

2022 Glentress

Tweed Valley Forest Park Glentress – Tuesday 26th April We met Carola, a member of the Glentress Team and her colleague, who took a group photo on a drizzly day as we headed off along the forest tracks. The higher we went along the newly constructed paths the drizzle eased and eventually the sun began to shine. Our coffee stop alongside a small lake, where James demonstrated his prowess going down a steep, rocky slope towards the water whilst the rest of us watched. The ramble today was in the shape of a figure of 8 and after the middle section we began a gradual steep slope up to the top where we had our lunch break. We met another member of the Glentress team checking the many cycle tracks on his very impressive electric bike. We set off again, downhill, to the relief of the walkers, towards the central section of the route. After returning to the road we turned left downhill, and met a monster tractor pulling a road roller flattening the newly laid hardcore. We had a short afternoon toilet stop before heading uphill, through the trees to see fantastic views towards Peebles. Then downhill again through the woods we continued and back to the start. At the Wild Watch Centre there was a ‘live link’ to an Osprey on its nest, which was a delight to see. Judy, Bernard & James

2022 Mellerstain

Today we started our 2022 rambles from Mellerstain House in the Scottish Borders with 7 scooters and 4 walkers. With James in the lead, we rambled from the beautiful Georgian House, which is the home of the Earls of Haddington, around the estate where we passed the many fallen trees that had been blown over owing to the high winds earlier in the year. The weather today was good with bright skies but with rather a cold breeze. We were joined by Janet and John, our new MSU towers and helpers who joined us only last year. At lunchtime we returned to the café by the House. We set off again in the afternoon through the woods, around the lake passing the stunning landscaped grounds and formal Italianate gardens to the rear of the house where we came across ‘the house of the indifference fanatic’ which is a gravity defying structure suspended in mid-air by opposing forces, which was quite a sight at the rear of the house and in front of the lake with its wildlife. Thank you to James for a very enjoyable day. Judy, Bernard and James

2022 Marbury Park RR

29th March: Regional Ramble Marbury Country Park and Neumann’s Flash. A beautiful spring day for six-mile ramble! Three scooter riders and two walkers set off through a small mainly evergreen arboretum before reaching the tree lined carriageway leading to the former site of Marbury Hall. Continuing on our route we arrived on the path alongside Budworth Mere. Here there was an unusually large number of people with binoculars intent on studying the birds on the mere. The ramble continued through woodland, with numerous patches of wood anemone, before crossing the Trent and Mersey Canal and stopping for coffee. We continued on to Dairy House Meadows and down to Neumann’s Flash. The Flash was formed when a salt mine collapsed in the late 1800s and filled with water. This area was later used to dump lime waste from a nearby chemical works before being reclaimed in 1970s, creating unique soil and water conditions that now support an unusual habitat. The route at the southern end of the Flash is lined with silver birch trees which looked stunning in the sunshine against the water and the blue sky. Our lunch stop was back at Dairy House Meadows. After lunch, our route took us parallel to Trent and Mersey Canal and along the towpath, before crossing over the canal and re-entering Marbury Park. Many thanks to David James, the Countryside Officer for Cheshire West and Chester, for his support with this ramble. Marian & Barry

Tramper – Designed for Disabled Rambling


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